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Tuesday, 27 July 2021 00:00

When the outer layer of skin on the sole of the feet comes in contact with the human papilloma virus, thickened growths called plantar warts can develop. The virus—which can lurk in public showers, pools, and locker rooms—enters through tiny breaks in the skin on the bottom of feet. These flat, rough masses sometimes have tiny black “dots” in the center, which are actually tiny blood vessels. They can be uncomfortable at times—especially if they occur on weight-bearing areas of the feet and toes. While verrucas can often heal on their own, they can be stubborn, and you may want to see a podiatrist to help get rid of them.

  

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact one of our podiatrists from Central Valley Foot & Ankle. Our doctors will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Lesions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Visalia, CA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Warts
Tuesday, 20 July 2021 00:00

Your ankle is made up of three bones, all of which can be broken or cracked from an injury. The tibia is the larger of two main bones that make up your ankle. You can feel the lower end of it along the inside of your ankle. The fibula is the thinner of the two main ankle bones, and you can feel the lower end of this bone along the outside of your ankle. The talus is a wedge-shaped bone located deep inside the ankle, between the heel bone and the ends of the tibia and fibula. Ankle fractures are usually caused by a sudden, sharp twist of the ankle or a direct impact to the area. Symptoms include immediate, severe pain, swelling, bruising, tenderness, and difficulty walking. If you suspect that you may have fractured your ankle, it is strongly suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist as soon as possible.

Broken ankles need immediate treatment. If you are seeking treatment, contact one of our podiatrists from Central Valley Foot & Ankle. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet. 

Broken Ankles
A broken ankle is experienced when a person fractures their tibia or fibula in the lower leg and ankle area. Both of these bones are attached at the bottom of the leg and combine to form what we know to be our ankle.

When a physician is referring to a break of the ankle, he or she is usually referring to a break in the area where the tibia and fibula are joined to create our ankle joint. Ankles are more prone to fractures because the ankle is an area that suffers a lot of pressure and stress. There are some obvious signs when a person experiences a fractured ankle, and the following symptoms may be present.

Symptoms of a Fractured Ankle

  • Excessive pain when the area is touched or when any pressure is placed on the ankle
  •  Swelling around the area
  •  Bruising of the area
  • Area appears to be deformed

If you suspect an ankle fracture, it is recommended to seek treatment as soon as possible. The sooner you have your podiatrist diagnose the fracture, the quicker you’ll be on the way towards recovery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Visalia, CA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about All About Broken Ankles
Tuesday, 13 July 2021 00:00

The Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) is a simple, non-invasive screening for peripheral artery disease, an ailment that affects blood flow in the lower limbs. The test consists of having your blood pressure measured at your upper arms and ankles. The doctor then compares the two resulting numbers to come up with a ratio that correlates to risk of having peripheral artery disease. Not everyone needs an ABI. It is usually reserved for patients who are most at risk of developing this condition. This includes people who are older, have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, atherosclerosis, a history of smoking, or symptoms of peripheral artery disease, such as leg pain, cramping, weakness, numbness, or difficulty walking. If you have any of these risk factors, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist for an ABI test.

Vascular testing plays an important part in diagnosing disease like peripheral artery disease. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, or diabetes, consult with one of our podiatrists from Central Valley Foot & Ankle. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Vascular Testing?

Vascular testing checks for how well blood circulation is in the veins and arteries. This is most often done to determine and treat a patient for peripheral artery disease (PAD), stroke, and aneurysms. Podiatrists utilize vascular testing when a patient has symptoms of PAD or if they believe they might. If a patient has diabetes, a podiatrist may determine a vascular test to be prudent to check for poor blood circulation.

How Is it Conducted?

Most forms of vascular testing are non-invasive. Podiatrists will first conduct a visual inspection for any wounds, discoloration, and any abnormal signs prior to a vascular test.

 The most common tests include:

  • Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) examination
  • Doppler examination
  • Pedal pulses

These tests are safe, painless, and easy to do. Once finished, the podiatrist can then provide a diagnosis and the best course for treatment.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Visalia, CA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Vascular Testing in Podiatry
Monday, 12 July 2021 00:00

Gout is a painful, inflammatory form of arthritis. Those affected will typically feel an intense stiffness in the joints of their feet, particularly in the big toe. Schedule a visit to learn about how gout can be managed and treated.

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